All posts filed under: economics

#hashbased for week 46

Leave a comment
Blockchain / economics / Finance / innovation

#hashbased is a blockchain innovation newsletter provided by HashBased.com, an OKA innovation brand Here they come: Peter Rudegeair and Liz Hoffman report in WSJ on Google’s ambitions to move into fintech and banking. The company is launching “Cache”, a service that will allow users opening checking accounts. This follows a similar announcement from Amazon, while Apple is already offering financial services in collaboration with Goldman Sachs. At the same time Facebook is launching Libra, its own […]

Decentralized innovation: data analytics and access to differentiated knowledge

Leave a comment
articles / economics / innovation / knowledge

Innovation is not a fixed-rate process and can be influenced by our ability to exploit the existing stock of knowledge, especially if that knowledge translates into broader distributions of available product complexity. However, before we build products we need to assess existing knowledge. If we are lucky enough to have already the right data we can use data analytics for that purpose. Modern tools for data mining, management, retrieval and processing allow for fairly complex, […]

Assorted links for 08/15/2019

Leave a comment
economics / food / history / innovation / Links

1. How ergodicity reimagines economics for the benefit of us all (economics) 2. The Rise of the Virtual Restaurant (innovation) 3. In Libris Libertas: Open Access Monographs in Classics, Ancient History, Art History, and Archaeology (history) 4. Hack in the box: Hacking into companies with “warshipping” (cybersecurity) 5. Human-sized penguin fossil discovered in New Zealand

Assorted links for 08/12/2019

Leave a comment
Books / economics / Links

1. Can you step in the same river twice? Wittgenstein v Heraclitus by David Egan (philosophy) 2. Counting Calories to Stay Fit? There’s a Trillion Little Problems With That (health) 3. Great Ideas Are Growing Scarce. That’s Not So Great by Noah Smith (innovation) 4. Yes, There Is a Trade-Off Between Inflation and Unemployment by Greg Mankiw (economics) 5. The economics of bubbles by Brent Goldfarb and David A Kirsch (economics) and their new book: […]

Somethin’s brewin’

Leave a comment
decision-making / economics / psychology

There is a very interesting debate going on for some time already about a psychological effect called “loss aversion” [1]. This effect, and many other similar psychological effects describing the peculiarities of human decision making, underpins the field of behavioral economics and behavioral finance. This effect has been called a fallacy. The popular idea that avoiding losses is a bigger motivator than achieving gains is not supported by the evidence. To get up to speed: […]

Knowledge, innovation, economic growth

comment 1
articles / economics / innovation / knowledge

On a macro level, knowledge creation relates to innovation and how it influences economic growth. Knowledge creation, however, originates at the micro level. Microeconomic evidence for knowledge creation and innovation at the level of individual inventors is however lacking. One interesting question is whether, and how, collaborations between individual scientists benefit knowledge creation. Such studies are important as they can inform policies. In context of innovation and economic growth, fostering collaborations and promoting collaborative spirit […]

Impossible meat

Leave a comment
economics / food

Alt meat isn’t going to stay alt for long, and cattle are looking more and more like stranded assets Outside While corn is hitting a six-year price highs there is an intense debate around plant based meat. Currently Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods and Nestlé are the main players but the alt-meat space is getting crowded fast. After a short trial in the St Louis area, the Impossible Whopper will be available at Burger Kings in US […]

Papers (1)

comment 1
economics / Papers

There are fascinating and scary consequences of the application of AI in human decision making. Some of the pitfalls should be carefully addressed. My recent working paper on the application of machine learning in behavioral economics to prescribe personalized interventions (nudging) is now on arXiv. I’d be grateful for any comments or suggestions you might have.